Reasons to Try Low-Carb… and Reasons Not To

Reasons to Try Low-Carb… and Reasons Not To
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If you are looking to lose weight and/or lower your blood sugars, you may have considered eating low-carb. There are many health benefits to reducing your carbohydrate intake. For those of us with diabetes, our bodies cannot properly break down sugar, so lowering carbs should naturally lower our blood sugar. Also, if you use insulin, cutting back on the carbs can also help you to reduce your insulin requirements.

With that said, people can be successful at weight and blood sugar management on both low-carb and high-carb diets. When I was eating very low-carb, I found the diet too restrictive and it messed with my mental health. In a previous article, I talked about how I increased my carb intake and still achieved the same A1c of 5.8.

The main goal is to find a way of eating that works for you, one that you can sustain and be successful at. I thought it would be nice to hear our community’s thoughts and experiences on eating low-carb…or not. While the definition of low-carb changes from person to person, the voices below define it as 100 grams of carbs a day or less.

People Living With Type 1 Who Prefer to Stay Lower Carb

“I feel better on low-carb for most things. Nothing strict, but I like to choose high protein and high fat over carbs. I think it’s definitely a personal preference. And I do splurge sometimes, though I’ll sometimes regret it because I can *feel* the unpleasant spike.” – Jessica R.

“I love low-carb. It helps me manage with way better accuracy and I do a lot of sports. The biggest issue is when I reintroduce a night out and I make a calculation error and it takes a couple of days of fumbling back to get on track.” – Nick G.

“I am not keto but do eat lower-carb. I have for many years and find it to be very helpful. I eat a higher protein diet. I am also an endurance athlete.” – Cathy J.

“Super easy and it regulates my blood sugar. I use a modified Paleo-type diet as a guideline. I typically have between 30-45 grams of carbs a day.” – Annie A.

“I try my best to be low-carb. It definitely helps me to lower my blood sugar. I try not to buy high-carb things when I shop, like bread and crackers, and when I eat out I do the best I can. If I am at a sandwich shop, I’ll eat what is on the menu and adjust my bolus for it.” – Mason R.

“I accidentally started low-carb one day and it has been great. Every 2-4 hours I eat 4 oz of protein and 2 oz of any vegetable. I never have to give myself insulin for it and my blood sugars stay stable all day with no unexpected highs or lows.” – Kelley B.

“I have been keto for about 10 years and have had type 1 for 32 years. I cycle and run and have found it much easier to manage under a keto diet. With so much less insulin on board, any highs or lows come on much more slowly. I have ridden century rides and run marathons with only needing water and with solid flat readings on my CGM the entire time. I miss a good carby beer, but overall well worth it.” – Owen F.

“I stick to low-carb most of the time but I don’t deprive myself if I want something carby. I use my insulin and most of the time my blood sugar remains stable.” – Allison C.

People Living With Type 1 Who Prefer Moderate to High Carb

“I don’t really worry about low-carb, I just try to eat good carbs. I know white rice, white flour and other types of carbs shoot my blood sugar through the roof so I try to limit those. I eat a lot of fruit though and whole wheat bread (love Dave’s Killer Bread). I can’t imagine doing keto or very low-carb though.” – Amanda S.

“I was low-carb, high-fat for about a year. Most days I was eating under 20 grams and always under 40 grams of carbs. Low-carb, high-fat worked great for snowshoeing at 9,000+ feet. It worked poorly for life in general (brain function, dependant on glycogen, glucogenesis from fat is slow). Cardio like running or cycle was a real struggle. Heart lungs and legs need glycogen when your heart rate elevates.” – Rob C.

“I work out 5 days a week and do strength training. For me personally, I like to use carbs before my workout for energy and I don’t limit them in general. Mastering the right dose of insulin at the right time is what it is all about” – Matt F.

“People with type 1 can still eat whatever they want. I enjoy my pizza and cake and still maintain optimal blood sugars.” – Kelly V.

Photo credit: iStock

People Living With Type 2 Who Choose Low-Carb

“I eat low-carb because it simplifies my life and reduces stress. I am a very carb-intolerant type 2. I ‘eat to my meter’ i.e. limit carbs enough to keep my meter readings in an acceptable range. For me, that’s about 30 grams of carbs a day. My choices are to eat what my body can handle or eat more carbs and take medication. I prefer to take the least amount of medicine, so low-carb it is. I don’t find it a big sacrifice, and after 11 years of low-carb, I feel better and less bloated, less hungry with no carb cravings.” – Lynn W.

“I needed to find a way of eating that helped all of the health issues I was facing (basically metabolic syndrome). A low-carb, healthy fat, moderate protein “diet” fit that bill quite nicely.” – Forum member

“[Low-carb] brought my blood sugar down, off all drugs. Sometimes I go off a bit (birthday parties?) but I see the impact on my daily blood test and it keeps me on course. Now I just avoid sugar and common carbs (rice, potatoes, bread, pasta) and that is enough. Oh, I have a house full of sugar substitute non-wheat flour baked bread, muffins, cookies & cake so I don’t miss anything. Just have to watch when out eating socially although there is usually enough to choose from.” – Forum member

“I joined a diabetes forum the day I was diagnosed with type 2 in 2011 and read many stories of doing well on an LCHF diet by members. The foods they reported eating to bring their diabetes under control are many of my favourites, so I decided to give it a go. The result was that I discovered I was very grain intolerant and my digestion improved dramatically when I stopped eating them. My weight started to drop fast as well, even though I was eating very high calories. Six months later I decided to take the extra step to go to a ketogenic diet, and everything improved even more as [I lowered] my carb intake to 12-20g a day and tested my ketones daily to make sure I was constantly in nutritional ketosis. I still test my ketones daily with my fasting glucose, and report both numbers here to keep myself honest. Nearly 10 years after starting low-carb, the weight loss has been maintained and I have never taken even a single metformin tablet. My quarterly HbA1c has been constantly between 5.0 and 5.2 (except for two 5.4 results) since six months after starting my low-carb diet. And I love the food I eat, so see no reason ever to go back to eating carbs for energy.” – Forum member

“I have type 2 and had my A1c in the 12 range. I was carb intolerant. My goal is to be medicine-free, have normal numbers, and to limit disease progression – and to keep the weight off.

“’Keto’ along with exercise helps my numbers remain ‘normal,’ weight is coming down slowly, BP numbers are in check, cholesterol is in normal limits, no longer have sleep issues/apnea. No T2 meds required, hope to be off my BP meds soon. A1C now in the low 5’s with normal fasting numbers.” – Forum member

People Living With Type 2 Who Prefer Moderate to High-Carb

“I’m type 2 and I don’t go low-carb since it’s a very restrictive diet. I have done low-carb in the past, and lost weight doing it. I just found it too hard to stick with when the people I dine with aren’t doing low-carb.” – Forum member

“I’m doing CICO (calories in and calories out) since you are allowed to eat anything as long you don’t go over calorie budget.” – Forum member

“I have been a type 1 since 2019. Before discovering low-carb I ate the advised 45-60g per meal which I got from Google/USDA guidelines. Truth is I’ve never been low-carb, more like moderate carb 100-200g per day. That was enough to promote rapid weight loss & return insulin sensitivity which improved over a year. My CGM trial had my A1c estimated at 4.6% & I only spent 1% of time above 140mg/dl.”- Forum member

“I do a lot of weight training and rely heavily on carbs for energy.” – Peter M.

“I’ve done research ad nauseum on what diet works best for diabetes, and long term, it appears that low-carb can actually increase insulin resistance. At first, it will definitely help your numbers, but other diets like the Mediterranean diet (which I am currently following) and Paleo have fared better in the long-term. It’s ultimately very individualized and depends on what works for you.” – Forum member

As you can see from our community members’ experiences, you can achieve both optimal blood sugars and weight on any diet. The trick is to find something you enjoy so that you can stick with it long-term.

Have you tried eating lower-carb? What was your experience like?

Diabetes Daily
Allison Caggia
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